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Old Men Offered Free Bad Advice as a Joke at First, but Now It’s a Phenomenon

What started as a joke for a group of men from Utah became a phenomenon.

One of the undeniable benefits of getting older – aside from developing such a mad, amazing sense of humor – is the wisdom of having been once or twice near the block. Their collective life experiences, as diverse as they are, should give you a degree of practical knowledge.

Sharing this knowledge with anyone who will listen is another benefit. The older you are, the more people you’ll probably hear as you move on, because who wants to be the guy who shuts down a Geezer (or a Geezette)? Not me, that’s for sure.

Anyone lucky enough to have grown up with their grandparents will know what I am talking about.

Sharing this knowledge with anyone who will listen is another benefit. The older you are, the more people you’ll probably hear as you move on, because who wants to be the guy who shuts down a Geezer (or a Geezette)? Not me, that’s for sure.

Anyone lucky enough to have grown up with their grandparents will know what I am talking about.

Even if you did not, there is a chance that there may be a group of elderly men or women around you who are in the local diner or deli and tell stories – like this group of friends from Salt Lake City, UT.

Realizing that they had heard each other’s stories, they decided to shake things up by setting up a table at their farmers’ market and giving free advice.

Tony Caputo, the owner of the deli, where the men would shoot down the breeze, made the table “Old Coots Giving Advice” official. He even got a banner with the slogan “It’s probably a bad piece of advice, but it’s free”. He unintentionally created a Saturday tradition that resonated great and grand in their community.

“We sat outside and were bored talking to each other, and I said,” Do you know what? I’ll get a stand on the farmer’s market across the street to give advice, “said Caputo Washington Post.

It turns out that tons of young people are looking for wisdom to solve their problems. Since the “coots” do not personally know the people they are talking to, they can give unbiased advice. Although the idea started as a bit of gag, they take their answers very seriously and are praised for giving thoughtful answers.

There are only two issues that are not under discussion: religion and politics. Everything else is fair game.

Here are some of the questions you received by mail:

“Where can I find someone whom I can love?”

“Why is my cat peeing everything in the house?”

“Did I spend enough time on my new job to take a week off?”

Caputo says, “Someone told us the other day that we are the most popular attraction in the market, we always listen attentively and give no advice.”

The “Coots” include Caputo; Lou Borgenicht, a 75-year-old retired pediatrician; 67-year-old retired primary school teacher Gus Wheeler; Rich Klein, a 73-year-old businessman who specializes in kitchen worktops; and John Lesnan, a 69-year-old former human resources manager. The only female mollusk is Carol Sisco, a 70-year-old former journalist. They also have a semiform coot mentoring program. Chris Vanocur is a 58-year-old coot trainee.

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