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Prince William Says Losing His Mother Diana At A Young Age Was A “Pain Like No Other”

The death of the late Princess Diana in 1997 sent shock waves around the world. Her premature demise came as a huge blow to her fans and admirers around the world, and the special place she holds in our hearts even today is a real proof of the purpose she left us alive. Although many regretted her unfortunate fate as that of a family member, it is undeniable that the two people most affected by her death are her two sons. Prince William and Prince Harry have opened up to the pain of losing their mother at a young age in a number of cases, and now that they have their own family, her absence is even more prominent in their lives.

Prince William Says Losing His Mother Diana At A Young Age Was A "Pain Like No Other"

A recently released preview for the BBC special A Royal Team Talk: Tackling Mental Health introduces the Duke of Cambridge to his personal experience of losing a loved one. According to the BBC, 36-year-old Prince William spoke frankly about how the tragic loss of his mother changed his life forever in the documentary, which aims to help others talk about their emotions. The prince made the revelations while talking to footballers Peter Crouch and Danny Rose, former players Thierry Henry and Jermaine Jenas, and England manager Gareth Southgate.

Prince William Says Losing His Mother Diana At A Young Age Was A "Pain Like No Other"

During his appearance in the BBC One documentary, Prince William said that while the “British stiff upper lip thing” had its place and benefits in times when it was difficult, the nation’s citizens also needed “to relax and talk a little about our emotions because we are not robots. “Speaking of how he dealt with the loss of his mother, the father of three said that the experience enabled him to relate to and empathize with others who have suffered a loss.

“I have thought a lot about this, and I am trying to understand why I feel this way, but I think if you are robbed at a very young age at any time, really, but especially at a young age, I resonate close to you, you feel pain like no other pain and you know that in your life it will be very difficult to come across something that will be even worse than the other people there who have had it, so immediately when you talk to someone else … You can almost see it in their eyes, “said the Duke of Cambridge.

During the candid session, Prince William also opened how working as an air ambulance pilot often made him feel that death was ‘just around the corner’. Regarding the emotional aspect of being an East Anglian Air Ambulance pilot, he said the experience was “difficult”, especially after leaving the army, where feelings are usually on the sidelines. For comparison: he says that the ambulance world was ‘much more open’. He revealed that at that time he was “experiencing very raw, emotional everyday things, dealing with families who have the worst news they could ever have.”

“That raw emotion … I could feel it welling up in me and I could feel it would take its toll and be a real problem. I had to talk about it,” Prince William added. In addition to the personal stories of the duke, the documentary due to the air on Sunday, Crouch, Rose, Henry, Jenas and Southgate are also told about the different psychological health problems and pressures they have during their professional footballer career to experience. Prince William and his brother, the Duke of Sussex, have been much more open about what they went through after the death of their beloved mother.

The two princes spoke about this during the launch of their mental health campaign, called Heads Together, which should encourage young people to talk more openly about their problems. According to a PEOPLE report, the honest stories of Prince William only come a few days after his younger brother opened during his recent trip to the Netherlands last Thursday, growing up against former soldier Dennis van der Stroom to start the official countdown to the Invictus Games in The Hague next year.

“I told Harry about my mother and we talked about our shared experience of missing a mother.” He said missing a mother is like missing a kind of safety, how you need it as a son and it falls away when you lose your mother. said he met many people in his work who had lost a mother, father, sister, brother or family members and when he heard their story, when he heard my story, he said he didn’t feel alone, “said van der Stroom.

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